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 Emerging Threats to Mothers and Babies

Public health emergencies – including disease outbreaks, natural and man-made disasters, and large-scale exposures to hazardous substances – pose unique risks for pregnant women, infants, and children. Gaps in emergency preparedness and response may leave pregnant women, infants, and children especially vulnerable. Title V maternal and child health agencies play a critical role in ensuring that the needs of pregnant women, infants, and children are central to statewide emergency preparedness and response planning and implementation.

 

Protecting Moms and Babies During Public Health Emergencies

A new CDC initiative, “Surveillance for Emerging Threats to Mothers and Babies,” is investing in public health data systems to better monitor and respond to the unique risks and needs of pregnant women, infants, and children during public health emergencies.


AMCHP convened three events in 2019 in partnership with CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities to discuss CDC's Surveillance for Emerging Threats to Mothers and Babies program, and more broadly, to identify gaps and solutions in protecting moms and babies during public health emergencies. A fact sheet, “Protecting Moms and Babies During Public Health Emergencies: Gaps and Solutions,” compiles the key themes of those discussions and offers examples of opportunities to address existing gaps.


To build continued federal support for efforts to protect moms and babies during public health emergencies, AMCHP organized a coalition in November 2019 of 17 leading national public health, clinical, and health policy organizations in writing a letter to the leaders of the House and Senate appropriations subcommittees with jurisdiction for CDC funding requesting a minimum of $10 million for the Surveillance for Emerging Threats to Mothers and Babies program in the final fiscal year 2020 appropriations legislation. This was the amount included in the final fiscal year 2020 appropriations legislation signed into law on Dec. 20, 2019.


For the latest information on CDC's Surveillance for Emerging Threats to Mothers and Babies program, please visit CDC's landing site for the program. 


For information about how you can support efforts related to federal funding for CDC's Surveillance for Emerging Threats to Mothers and Babies program, please contact Alyson Northrup, AMCHP's Associate Director for Government Affairs, at anorthrup@amchp.org.