#ScreenToInterveneForAYAs: Adolescent and Young Adult Behavioral Health Blog

 

Welcome to the #ScreenToInterveneForAYAs Adolescent and Young Adult Behavioral Health Blog!  Supported by the Adolescent and Young Adult Health National Resource Center,*  this is a space for state Title V maternal and child health professionals and their partners to learn about efforts to build better preventive care systems for optimal adolescent and young adult wellbeing across the country. As you navigate this site, you’ll see short posts that include food for thought, resources, reflections, and stories related to the work being done by Title V to support optimal emotional wellness among AYAs.  Please feel free to share your reactions, ideas, and feelings by tweeting us (@DC_AMCHP) and using the hashtag, #ScreenToInterveneForAYAs. 

 

If you’d like to submit a post, please contact Anna Corona (acorona@amchp.org) to have your writing featured!

  
Picture Placeholder: Anna Corona
  • Anna Corona
010/15/2019 2:40 PM

For today's blog post, I'd like to highlight a very exciting pillar of the AYAH National Resource Center's programmatic work: the Adolescent and Young Adult Behavioral Health Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network. Yes, that's quite a long name; let's lovingly refer to this project as "the CoIIN" for the rest of this post.  We at AMCHP, in partnership with the National Improvement Partnership Network (NIPN), are thrilled to have the privilege of administering the CoIIN (for those that are unfamiliar: what is a CoIIN?) because it's a shining example of how state MCH programs are at the forefront of making sure the rubber does indeed meet the road in efforts to improve AYA well-being.  You can read the full announcement of the CoIIN project for more details, but here's the 30 second version:

 

  • Who's involved?  There are a total of five multi-disciplinary state teams participating in the CoIIN (Indiana, Minnesota, South Carolina, Wisconsin, and Vermont).  AMCHP and NIPN serve as technical assistance supports to all five teams.
  • What are the state teams trying to achieve? They're working to increase the rate of major depressive episode screenings among patients aged 12-25 using an age-appropriate screening tool with documentation of a follow-up plan if the screen is positive.
  • What's the approach? Simply put, each state has two teams: a public health team and a clinical team. The clinical team will work directly towards improving screening rates in their settings using a quality improvement methodology, while the public health team will work on improving the systems that surround clinics in order to remove barriers to screenings for both providers and the families they serve.
  • Still curious?  Check out the official CoIIN announcement and/or contact Anna Corona (acorona@amchp.org) or Iliana White (iwhite@amchp.org).

 

We will be sure to sprinkle updates on this exciting CoIIN work throughout this blog over the next year.  Be on the lookout for guest writers, and if we have some brave souls—video updates! Let us know your thoughts below, or on Twitter by using the #ScreenToInterveneForAYAs and tagging us in your post @AMCHP_GrowingUp!  


10/15/2019 2:40 PMNo
  
Picture Placeholder: Anna Corona
  • Anna Corona
010/3/2019 9:52 AM

Greetings, and welcome to this blog! My name is Anna Corona and I work for the Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs as the Program Manager for Child & Adolescent Health (AMCHP).  AMCHP is one of several partners that make up the Adolescent and Young Adult National Resource Center collaboration, which is led by the UCSF's National Adolescent Health Information Center.* 

This blog will be a place where you can come to peruse the latest happenings of the Center's work as well as the latest news and resources related to Adolescent and Young Adult Behavioral Health.  Last, but certainly not least, we hope that this can be a space for Title V professionals and their partners to glean perspectives, insights, and ideas as they relate to the posts we share here (please let us know if you'd like to guest write for us! acorona@amchp.org).  With each blog post we invite you to respond via Twitter (@DC_AMCHP) with reactions, ideas, and questions.  We will plan to post a new entry approximately every two weeks, so keep an eye out for us!   

To kick us off, I'd like to pose a question to our readers:

What motivates you to dedicate your time and passion to supporting optimal emotional wellness among adolescents and young adults?

To jump start the discussion, I'll share AMCHP's motivations:  As an organization committed to the optimal health of women, children, adolescents, and families, the rising rates of major depressive episodes (MDEs) among adolescents (ages 12-17) and young adults (ages 18-25) is troubling. We understand the importance of co-creating environments for and with AYAs that support their emotional well-being to reverse this trend.  This co-creation approach is reflected in our most recent strategic plan, where AMCHP prioritizes youth-engaged work to transform the spaces where AYAs seek care, live, study, work, and play.   

Let us know your own motivations by tweeting us @DC_AMCHP and including the #ScreenToInterveneForAYAs hashtag.

*The Center is funded by a cooperative agreement with the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration and focuses on improving the health of adolescent and young adults (ages 10-25) by strengthening the capacity of state maternal and child health programs and their clinical partners to address the needs of those populations.


10/3/2019 9:52 AMNo

*The AYAH-NRC is funded by a cooperative agreement with the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. The center's work focuses on improving the health of adolescent and young adults (ages 10-25) by strengthening the capacity of state maternal and child health programs and their clinical partners to address the needs of those populations. The AYAH-NRC collaboration is led by the National Adolescent and Young Adult Health Information Center at the University of California, San Francisco, in partnership with AMCHP, the University of Minnesota's State Adolescent Health Resource Center, and the University of Vermont National Improvement Partnership Network.