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Title V Technical Assistance Meeting

 The March of Dimes Prematurity Prevention Conference

MoD Conference.jpgThe Prematurity Prevention Conference 2015: Quality Improvement, Evidence and Practice will take place on Nov. 17 and 18 in Arlington, VA. The conference is hosted by the March of Dimes, as part of its Prematurity Campaign, with AMCHP and other partners. Nov. 17 is World Prematurity Day, when hundreds of organizations worldwide conduct awareness and advocacy events to call for actions to prevent premature birth and improve care. The March of Dimes Prematurity Campaign was launched in 2003 with the goal of reducing the rate of premature birth in the United States.

Participants from various backgrounds – health care practitioners, insurers and purchasers, policymakers, regulators and advocates – will examine ways to enhance prematurity prevention efforts by sharing best practices for designing, implementing and evaluating programs and policies. Join them.

Prematurity Prevention Conference 2015: Quality Improvement, Evidence and Practice
Nov. 17 (8:30 a.m.) to Nov. 18 (12:00 noon)
Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, VA
Registration and Information: www.marchofdimes.org/conferences

The conference will focus on interventions and collaborative initiatives to prevent prematurity, including quality improvement, group prenatal care, elimination of early elective deliveries, and birth spacing. General sessions will include updates on the science of premature birth and transdisciplinary research.

Even if you can't make it to the conference, be sure to join the March of Dimes Prematurity Prevention Network, created in 2012 as a way to keep the conversation going outside of conferences. The PrematurityPrevention.org website offers network members a venue to converse on new and relevant topics through private communities and forums. It is the most comprehensive source of information for professionals on premature birth and preventing premature births.

Visitors to www.prematurityprevention.org are asked to join the network free of charge. After joining, members have the opportunity to download toolkits and reports, view statistics from the March of Dimes perinatal data center, see promising programs and interventions, and connect with other professionals online.

The 2015 Prematurity Prevention Conference is organized by the March of Dimes in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM), American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), AMCHP, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO), Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), and National Association of County & City Health Officials (NACCHO).

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.