Skip Navigation Links
May/June 2019Expand May/June 2019
March/April 2019Expand March/April 2019
January/February 2019Expand January/February 2019
November/December 2018Expand November/December 2018
September/October 2018Expand September/October 2018
July/August 2018Expand July/August 2018
May/June 2018Expand May/June 2018
March/April 2018Expand March/April 2018
January/February 2018Expand January/February 2018
July/August 2017Expand July/August 2017
May/June 2017Expand May/June 2017
March/April 2017Expand March/April 2017
January/February 2017Expand January/February 2017
November/December 2016Expand November/December 2016
July/August 2016Expand July/August 2016
May/June 2016Expand May/June 2016
March/April 2016Expand March/April 2016
January/February 2016Expand January/February 2016
November/December 2015Expand November/December 2015
July/August 2015Expand July/August 2015
May/June 2015Expand May/June 2015
March/April 2015Expand March/April 2015
January/February 2015Expand January/February 2015
ArchiveExpand Archive
November/December 2017Expand November/December 2017
PulseTemplate
September/October 2015Expand September/October 2015
September/October 2016Expand September/October 2016
September/October 2017Expand September/October 2017
Special Edition - EPRExpand Special Edition - EPR
Special Edition: Title V Technical Assistance MeetingExpand Special Edition: Title V Technical Assistance Meeting
Title V Technical Assistance Meeting

 Data and Trends

By Cheryl Clark, DrPH, RHIA
Associate Director, Epidemiology and Evaluation
AMCHP

A published analysis highlighted a "substantial" decrease in Years of Life Lost (YLL) or deaths due to premature mortality among the black population from between 1990 and 2014. However, despite this decline, there is a continued disparity between YLL for blacks compared to YLL for whites.1

The figures show the overall infant mortality rates and infant mortality rates for deaths due to low birth weight/prematurity and unintentional injuries for U.S. infants between 2010 and 2014. Similarly, wide disparities in infant mortality also remain constant between black and white infants.  While we celebrate any reduction in mortality, as this figure shows, there is still much work to be done.

chart 1.JPG

chart 2.JPG

chart 3.JPG

1Buchanich JM, Doerfler SM, Lann MF, Marsh GM, Burke DS (2018) Improvement in racial disparities in years of life lost in the USA since1990. PLoS ONE 13(4): e0194308.